APPLICATION NOTE

PC Configuration Tips
PCI Imaging Boards

11 JANUARY 2017

For use with:
EPIX® Imaging Hardware
EPIX® Imaging Software


Copyright © 2017 EPIX, Inc.
No part of this document may be reproduced, transmitted, photocopied, or translated into another language without the written consent of EPIX, Inc. Information in this document is subject to change without obligation or notice. EPIX, Inc. makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this document, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. EPIX, Inc. assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document. EPIX, Inc. reserves the right to make changes to the specifications of hardware and software at any time, without obligation or notice.

4MIP, SVIP, XCIP, XCAP, 4MEG VIDEO, 1MEG VIDEO, SILICON VIDEO MUX, QUICK SET VIDEO, 12-7MUX, IMAGE MEMORY EXPANSION, COC40, and COC402 are trademarks of EPIX, Inc.

EPIX, SILICON VIDEO, and PIXCI are registered trademarks of EPIX, Inc.

Other brand, product, and company names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Printing: 03-Mar-2017

EPIX, Inc.
381 Lexington Drive
Buffalo Grove IL 60089
847.465.1818
847.465.1919 (fax)
epix@epixinc.com
www.epixinc.com

Table of Contents


 

 

 

1. PCI Card Resources and BIOS Plug & Play

 

1.1. Required Bus Resources

''Plug & Play'' compatible EPIX® imaging products are assigned bus resources, such as register addresses and interrupts (IRQ), automatically by BIOS or the operating system. The Plug & Play compatible EPIX® frame grabbers, current and superseded models, are:

Hardware Card Uses Bus Vendor Device
Type IRQ's Master ID ID

PIXCI® A PCI Yes Yes 10E8 82B1
PIXCI® A110 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A A110
PIXCI® A110 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A A117
PIXCI® A310 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A A310
PIXCI® CL1 PCI Yes Yes 165A C100
PIXCI® CL1 PCI Yes Yes 165A C10A
PIXCI® CL2 PCI 64 bit Yes Yes 165A C200
PIXCI® CL3SD PCI Yes Yes 165A C300
PIXCI® CL3SD PCI Yes Yes 165A C301
PIXCI® D PCI Yes Yes 10E8 80D6
PIXCI® D24 PCI Yes Yes 10E8 80D6
PIXCI® D32 PCI Yes Yes 10E8 80D6
PIXCI® D2X PCI Yes Yes 165A D200
PIXCI® D2X PCI Yes Yes 165A D201
PIXCI® D2X PCI Yes Yes 165A D20A
PIXCI® D3X PCI Yes Yes 165A D300
PIXCI® D3XE PCI Yes Yes 165A ED30
PIXCI® DVO PCI Yes Yes 10E8 817F
PIXCI® E1 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E001
PIXCI® E1 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E0A1
PIXCI® E1DB PCI Express Yes Yes 165A ED01
PIXCI® E1DB PCI Express Yes Yes 165A EDA1
PIXCI® E4 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E004
PIXCI® E4DB PCI Express Yes Yes 165A ED04
PIXCI® E4G2-2F PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E504
PIXCI® E4G2-4B PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E704
PIXCI® E4G2-F2B PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E604
PIXCI® E8 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E008
PIXCI® E8CAM PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E0C8
PIXCI® E8DB PCI Express Yes Yes 165A ED08
PIXCI® e104x4-2f PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E204
PIXCI® e104x4-4b PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E404
PIXCI® e104x4-f2b PCI Express Yes Yes 165A E304
PIXCI® EB1 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A EB01
PIXCI® EB1-PoCL PCI Express Yes Yes 165A EB11
PIXCI® EB1mini PCI Exp. mini Yes Yes 165A EB21
PIXCI® EB1mini PCI Exp. mini Yes Yes 165A EB31
PIXCI® EB1tg PCI Express Yes Yes 165A EB41
PIXCI® EC1 ExpressCard/54 Yes Yes 165A EC01
PIXCI® EC1 ExpressCard/54 Yes Yes 165A ECF1
PIXCI® ECB1 ExpressCard/54 Yes Yes 165A ECB1
PIXCI® ECB1-34 ExpressCard/34 Yes Yes 165A ECB3
PIXCI® ECB2 ExpressCard/54 Yes Yes 165A ECB2
PIXCI® EL1 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A F001
PIXCI® EL1 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A F0A1
PIXCI® EL1 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A F0F1
PIXCI® EL1DB PCI Express Yes Yes 165A FD01
PIXCI® EL1DB PCI Express Yes Yes 165A FDF1
PIXCI® ELS2 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A F002
PIXCI® SI PCI Yes Yes 165A C000
PIXCI® SI PCI Yes Yes 165A C001
PIXCI® SI1 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A C011
PIXCI® SI2 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A C002
PIXCI® SI2 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A C012
PIXCI® SI4 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A C004
PIXCI® SI4 PCI Express Yes Yes 165A C024
PIXCI® SV2 PCI Yes Yes 8086 1223
PIXCI® SV3 PCI Yes Yes 8086 1223
PIXCI® SV4 PCI Yes Yes 109E 0350
PIXCI® SV5 PCI Yes Yes 109E 036E
PIXCI® SV5 PCI Yes Yes 109E 0878
PIXCI® SV5A PCI Yes Yes 109E 036E
PIXCI® SV5A PCI Yes Yes 109E 0878
PIXCI® SV5B PCI Yes Yes 109E 036E
PIXCI® SV5B PCI Yes Yes 109E 0878
PIXCI® SV5L PCI Yes Yes 109E 036E
PIXCI® SV5L PCI Yes Yes 109E 0878
PIXCI® SV6 PCI Yes Yes 14F1 8800
PIXCI® SV7 PCI Yes Yes 165A EA02
PIXCI® SV8 PCI Yes Yes 165A EA03
PIXCI® TNTX1 PCI Yes Yes 165A F0B1
Under the Plug & Play architecture, if all add-in cards are Plug & Play compatible, no resource conflicts should occur. In practice, problems still occur, although less frequently than with legacy ISA bus cards, and primarily on earlier PCI compatible motherboards.

 

1.2. ISA Cards

The computer's Plug & Play system can perform conflict free configuration only if all add-in cards are Plug & Play; presence of an ISA legacy card can't be detected by Plug & Play, and resources used by the legacy card may be reassigned. The conflicting resource is often an interrupt (IRQ). Computers with support for both Plug & Play and legacy ISA card's typically have BIOS Setup options such as:

    IRQ 10  Used/Available
    IRQ 11  Used/Available
These allow manually marking as ''Used'' for all IRQ's utilized by an ISA card; any IRQ's not so marked may be assigned and/or shared among the Plug & Play cards.

 

1.3. Insufficient Resources

The Plug & Play system is designed to automatically assign resources in a non-conflicting manner. However, resources are still limited, and there is no guarantee that every card will have its requirements fulfilled. Systems differ in how they notify the user of insufficient resources. If a Plug & Play card can't be detected by its software, try removing other Plug & Play cards to free various resources.

 

1.4. IRQ Sharing

The Plug & Play system may assign multiple PCI cards to share the same interrupt. Depending on the characteristics of the two (or more) devices sharing an interrupt, and the characteristics of the selected operating system, one or both devices may always work, may never work, or may work intermittently.

IRQ sharing is a concern for cards using the older PCI bus w. IRQ pins, but not for cards using PCI Express and its Message Signaled Interrupts (MSI).

Test for IRQ sharing by using XCAP:

   PIXCI®
   PIXCI® Open/Close
   Advanced
   Allow Shared IRQ: Uncheck
   OK
   Open
If the Open succeeds, then the IRQ was not being shared. If the Open does not succeed and a ''Configuration Error or Fault'' dialog is shown with a message such as ''Bad or conflicting IRQ'', then the IRQ was being shared with another device. This tests for conflict, but does not resolve the conflict.

IRQ sharing may or may not work, depending upon the various devices involved. On some motherboards, IRQs are assigned by physical slot; try moving the PIXCI® frame grabber to a different slot. On other motherboards, the BIOS Setup may allow assigning IRQs to different slots; or may at least allow specifying which IRQ's are to be parceled out amongst all slots.

Under Windows 95 and 98, on some motherboards, the Windows Device Manager may be able to change the assigned IRQ. In the Control Panel, System, Device Manager, click ''Computer'', ''Properties'', ''Interrupt Request (IRQ)'' to display a list of devices and their IRQ's. Find the device using the same IRQ as the PIXCI® frame grabber. In the Device Manager, highlight the offending card and click ''Properties'', ''Resources''. Uncheck ''Use automatic settings'', highlight the IRQ, click ''Change Setting'', and select a different IRQ.

 

1.5. Windows NT - Resource Allocation

Later versions of Windows NT may re-allocate PCI resources allocated by BIOS, when it ''moves the PCI device resources on top of another PCI device that has not yet been claimed'' (see Microsoft article Q152044). This most often causes a problem when multiple PIXCI® frame grabbers are used. It may be prevented by adding the /PCILOCK option to a C:\BOOT.INI entry, for example:

    [operating systems]
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(7)\WINNT="Windows NT V 4.00"  /PCILOCK
Do not copy this new line exactly as is; the first portion of the line must be copied from an existing configuration line in your C:\BOOT.INI file.

 

1.6. Windows 95/98 - Other BIOS Issues

Some versions of BIOS may have a setting to select the operating system:

    Operating System: Windows 95/98
                      Other
These systems might run under Windows NT with the wrong BIOS setting, but Plug & Play PCI cards may not operate correctly.

 

1.7. PCI Express Card not Found on Fast Booting Computers

The PIXCI® A110, A310, D3XE, E1, E1DB, EB1, EB1-PoCL, EB1mini, EB1tg, EC1, ECB1, ECB1-34, ECB2, EL1, EL1DB, SI1, SI2, SV7, and SV8 frame grabbers require a fraction of a second to initialize after power up, before it can identify itself to the operating system. On some fast-booting computers, the operating system may not see the card, and won't load the card's driver.

On some computers, the PIXCI® frame grabber may not be detected after a ''hard'' reboot (cycling computer power), but will be detected after a ''soft'' reboot (without cycling computer power). On some others, the frame grabbers will not be detected even after a soft reboot.

A firmware upgrade to the PIXCI® frame grabber will allow detection on fast booting computers.

On some computers with Windows 10, and with updated PIXCI® firmware, the PIXCI® frame grabber may be detected after a soft restart, but not a hard reboot. Disabling Windows' ''Turn on Fast Startup'' (under Control Panel, Power Options) will allow detection after a hard reboot. (circa Jan. 2017).


 

 

 

2. Drivers and OS Plug & Play

 

2.1. PCI Vendor and Device ID Conflict

The Windows 95, 98, ME, 2000, XP, Vista, 7, 8, and 10 Plug & Play utilizes a PCI card's Vendor and Device ID to select a driver and associate the driver with a card. The DOS, Windows NT, and Linux operating systems do not select a driver via Plug & Play, but rather the loaded driver searches for eligible and compatible cards. The PIXCI® SV2, SV3, SV4, SV5, SV5A, SV5B, SV5L, and SV6 frame grabbers share their PCI Vendor and Device ID with other cards, by other manufacturers, which use similar multimedia chipsets. This may cause confusion under any of those operating systems.

The PIXCI® driver may be associated with a non-PIXCI card. Attempts by XCIP or XCAP software to open non-PIXCI multimedia cards, which the PIXCI driver interprets as a PIXCI® SV2, SV3, SV4, SV5, SV5A, SV5B, SV5L, or SV6, typically results in a ''Can't access 18V8/16LV8'' error. If the PIXCI® frame grabber(s) are removed and the same error occurs, then it is almost certain that other cards using similar multimedia chipsets are present.

Alternately, a non-PIXCI driver may be associated with a PIXCI® frame grabber. Under Windows 95, 98, ME, 2000, XP, Vista, 7, 8, and 10, only one driver can be associated with a card and XCIP or XCAP software will therefore not be able to open the PIXCI® frame grabber; a typical error is ''Driver not installed ... or frame grabber not installed''. Under Linux, both drivers may have the frame grabber open, but interrupts (IRQ) may not occur; or, the PIXCI® frame grabber driver may report a ''DDrequest_(mem)_region'' error, if the multimedia driver has already opened the PIXCI® frame grabber.

 

2.2. Windows 95/98 - Registry Issues

Under Windows 95 and 98, automatic recognition and installation of PCI cards is dependent upon each PCI card's unique ID, and gets confused if there are two or more different cards with the same ID, even if one of them is no longer installed. For example, the PIXCI® SV2 and SV3 frame grabber ID's are determined by a Philips PCI Bus Interface chip, and thus share the same ID as other cards using the same chip. Similarly, the PIXCI® SV4, SV5, SV5A, SV5B, SV5L, and SV6 frame grabber ID is determined by a Brooktree (Conexant) PCI Bus Interface chip. Before automatic installation of the PIXCI® frame grabber's drivers can succeed, the Windows 95 and 98 registry entries and .INF files for all impostors must be removed:

  1. In Windows 95, using REGEDIT, remove folder:
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_10E8&DEV_82B1      (for PIXCI® A)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C300      (for PIXCI® CL3SD)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C301      (for PIXCI® CL3SD)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C100      (for PIXCI® CL1)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C10A      (for PIXCI® CL1)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C200      (for PIXCI® CL2)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_10E8&DEV_80D6      (for PIXCI® D, D24, D32)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D200      (for PIXCI® D2X)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D201      (for PIXCI® D2X)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D20A      (for PIXCI® D2X)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D300      (for PIXCI® D3X)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_10E8&DEV_817F      (for PIXCI® DVO)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C000      (for PIXCI® SI)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C001      (for PIXCI® SI)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0350      (for PIXCI® SV4)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E      (for PIXCI® SV5)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878      (for PIXCI® SV5)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E      (for PIXCI® SV5A)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878      (for PIXCI® SV5A)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E      (for PIXCI® SV5B)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878      (for PIXCI® SV5B)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E      (for PIXCI® SV5L)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878      (for PIXCI® SV5L)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_14F1&DEV_8800      (for PIXCI® SV6)
    
    In Windows 98, using REGEDIT, remove folder:
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_10E8&DEV_82B1&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® A)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C300&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® CL3SD)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C301&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® CL3SD)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C100&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® CL1)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C10A&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® CL1)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C200&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® CL2)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_10E8&DEV_80D6&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® D, D24, D32)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D200&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® D2X)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D201&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® D2X)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D20A&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® D2X)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D300&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® D3X)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_10E8&DEV_817F&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® DVO)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C000&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SI)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C001&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SI)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_1223&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV2, SV3)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0350&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV4)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV5)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV5)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV5A)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV5A)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV5B)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV5B)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV5L)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV5L)
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\ENUM\PCI\VEN_14F1&DEV_8800&SUBSYS_00000000&REV_**   (for PIXCI® SV6)
    
    where the **'s may be any digits (assigned and created by Windows after detection of the PIXCI® frame grabber).

  2. In C:\WINDOWS\INF, remove all .INF files which contain:
    PCI\VEN_10E8&DEV_82B1                                  (for PIXCI® A)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C100                                  (for PIXCI® CL1)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C10A                                  (for PIXCI® CL1)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C200                                  (for PIXCI® CL2)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C300                                  (for PIXCI® CL3SD)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C301                                  (for PIXCI® CL3SD)
    PCI\VEN_10E8&DEV_80D6                                  (for PIXCI® D, D24, D32)
    PCI\VEN_10E8&DEV_817F                                  (for PIXCI® DVO)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D200                                  (for PIXCI® D2X)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D201                                  (for PIXCI® D2X)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D20A                                  (for PIXCI® D2X)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_D300                                  (for PIXCI® D3X)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C000                                  (for PIXCI® SI)
    PCI\VEN_165A&DEV_C001                                  (for PIXCI® SI)
    PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_1223                                  (for PIXCI® SV2, SV3)
    PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0350                                  (for PIXCI® SV4)
    PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E                                  (for PIXCI® SV5)
    PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878                                  (for PIXCI® SV5)
    PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E                                  (for PIXCI® SV5A)
    PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878                                  (for PIXCI® SV5A)
    PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E                                  (for PIXCI® SV5B)
    PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878                                  (for PIXCI® SV5B)
    PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_036E                                  (for PIXCI® SV5L)
    PCI\VEN_109E&DEV_0878                                  (for PIXCI® SV5L)
    PCI\VEN_14F1&DEV_8800                                  (for PIXCI® SV6)
    
    For safety, move these to a new subdirectory (of any name), rather than deleting the files. The Driver Assistant in XCAP can perform the registry cleanup automatically, although it does not save any of the removed files.

  3. Reboot the PC. When Windows requests drivers for the PIXCI® frame grabber, specify the directory into which XCIP or XCAP software was previously unpacked.
Alternately, use the manual installation of the driver and modification of the registry, as per the installation instructions.

 

2.3. Windows 2000, XP Error: 'Drivers Not Installed'

If in response to Windows initial detection of a PIXCI® frame grabber and subsequent query for a driver, Windows 2000, or XP finds a Windows 95 or 98 driver, that driver will be loaded but not work properly. Windows 2000, and XP will no longer query about loading PIXCI® drivers, but the Device Manager will report that drivers are not installed, typically with an error code of ''28''. To remedy: a) Delete the system copies of the PIXCI® driver's .inf and .pnf files, b) Using the Device Manager, uninstall the driver associated with the PIXCI® entry, c) Using the XCAP Driver Assistant, uninstall the PIXCI® driver, d) Reboot, or using the Device Manager initiate a scan for hardware changes, e) When the PIXCI® frame grabber is detected advise Windows that a specific driver ''location'' will be specified, but do not select CDROM, f) Specify the location as the DRIVERS\WIN2K or DRIVERS\WINXP folder under the XCAP installation folder, g) Reboot.

 

2.4. Windows 2000, XP Error: 'Invalid Data'

On some Windows 2000 and XP Dell systems, after Windows Plug & Play detects the PIXCI® frame grabber and queries for a driver, Plug & Play may report an ''Invalid Data'' error. This occurs when Windows has erroneously marked the PCI slot in the registry as ''READ ONLY''.

To remedy: (a) Click Start, Run, and ''regedt32'' (using the alternate ''regedit'' editor will NOT work). (b) Navigate to:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ENUM\PCI
(c) Select a VEN_xxxx&DEV_xxxx.. entry which corresponds to the PIXCI® frame grabber being used (see list above). (d) Right click and select ''Permissions''. (e) Click ''Allow''. (f) Close regedt32 and continue with driver installation (i.e. Start, System, Control Panel, Add New Hardware, etc.).

 

2.5. Windows XP Error: 'Required section was not found in the INF'

Under some Windows XP installations, attempts to install the PIXCI® driver result in a Windows ''Required section was not found in the INF'' error. This is not a PIXCI® specific problem. A Windows registry key is missing, namely:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{6BDD1FC6-810F-11D0-BEC7-08002BE2092F}
Instructions for correcting the Windows registry can be found at:
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=c00206488

 

2.6. Windows XP Error: 'The class installer has denied the request to install or upgrade this device'

Under Windows XP, attempts to install the PIXCI® driver result in a Windows ''The class installer has denied the request to install or upgrade this device'' error. This is not a PIXCI® specific problem. The error is typically caused by a computer virus attacking and modifying the Windows registry. The virus may still be present, or the virus may have been destroyed; but the effects of the changes to the registry remain.

Use ''regedit'' to remove the

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\EPIXXCW2
entry, reboot, and then use Windows' Device Manager to reinstall the PIXCI® driver. XCAP's PIXCI, PIXCI Open/Close, Driver Assistant, Uninstall PIXCI Driver can be used instead of ''regedit''.

 

2.7. Windows 8 and later: Shutdown versus Restart

After installing a driver, installing an updated driver, or changing frame buffer memory allocation settings, under Windows 8/10 32/64-Bit the system's Restart, not Shutdown, must be used for the changes to have effect! (Circa 04-Dec-2012).

 

2.8. PCIe/104 Error: 'Drivers Not Installed' or 'Frame Grabber not Found'

PCIe/104 slots can be configured in two different ways: a) As one x16 bus, or b) As bifurcated into two x8 buses. The PIXCI® e104x4 requires the bifurcated configuration. If the bus is not bifurcated, the frame grabber might not be detected by the operating system, or additional PCIe/104 devices cannot be added above the frame grabber in the stack. Refer to the motherboard documentation about implementing bus bifurcation. (Circa 2016).

 

2.9. Windows 7 and later: Invalid Driver Digital Signature

Microsoft has changed the behavior of Windows 7 and later so as to require the new SHA-2 style digital signature on any driver dated 2016 or later. EPIX, Inc. now supplies drivers with both SHA-1 and SHA-2 signatures, as well as supplying drivers signed only with SHA-1 for compatibility with older systems.

However, Windows 7 may require an update to use drivers signed with SHA-2; see Microsofts'

    Microsoft Security Advisory 2949927
    Microsoft Security Advisory 3033929
Windows Vista may also require an update; see
    Microsoft Article ID 2763674
(Circa 2016)

 

 

 

3. PCI Bus Master (DMA) & Bus Bandwidth

 

3.1. Bus Mastering

Imaging boards without on-board memory use PCI bus master mode (i.e. DMA) to transfer image data to the PC's memory in real time. The available bandwidth of PCI motherboards differs widely; not all PCI motherboards can support continuous, full field, real time capture into PC memory.

Some motherboards may not support Bus Mastering in every PCI slot; the motherboard's documentation should describe which slots may be used. Also, some older motherboards may have PCI slots, but are not Plug & Play compatible; the BIOS Setup screens may require manual enabling of master mode and assignment of IRQ's for each PCI slot:

    Device Select:      Slot 0
    Enable Device:      Enabled
    Enable Master:      Enabled
    Device IRQ Line:    IRQ 11

Older motherboards may initialize with PCI Burst Mode deactivated; other motherboards may not support PCI Burst Mode at all. PCI Burst Mode is critical to utilizing the full bandwidth of the PCI bus. Some versions of BIOS Setup allow enabling PCI Burst Mode:

    PCI Burst Mode      Enabled
Older graphic display (S/VGA) cards may not operate properly with Burst Mode enabled; consult the graphic display (S/VGA) card manufacturer for updated drivers which allow use of Burst Mode. (Circa 1995?)

 

3.2. BIOS - Memory Parity Error (MPE)

See Windows - Blue Screen of Death (BSoD), below.

 

3.3. Windows - Blue Screen of Death (BSoD)

The PIXCI® PCI Express and ExpressCard frame grabbers (D3XE, E1, E1DB, E4, E4DB, E4G2-2F, E4G2-4B, E4G2-F2B, E8, E8CAM, E8DB, e104x4-2f, e104x4-4b, e104x4-f2b, EB1, EB1-PoCL, EB1mini, EC1, ECB1, ECB1-34, ECB2, EL1, ELS2, EL1DB, SI1, SI2, or SI4) require:

    PCI SERR# Generation    Disable(d)
to be set in the BIOS. Otherwise, a BSoD or MPE (Memory Parity Error) may occur when the PIXCI® imaging card is opened. For some motherboards, this option may not exist and is, by default, disabled.

The PIXCI® PCI Express and ExpressCard frame grabbers require:

    ASSERT NMI on SERR      Disable(d)
Otherwise, a BSoD or MPE may occur when the PIXCI® imaging card is opened. On some motherboards, this option is a jumper rather than a BIOS setting.

 

3.4. XCAP/XCLIB Error: 'Video not captured! (PCI FIFO Overflow)'

A bus mastering (DMA) type of PIXCI® frame grabber transfers video across the PCI bus; high resolution, high bit depth, and/or high frame rate all contribute to use of increased PCI bus bandwidth. If sufficient PCI bus bandwidth is not available, XCAP software shows a ''PCI FIFO Overflow'' error message.

The PCI bus bandwidth of a given PC motherboard is not dependent on the speed of the CPU, but on the attributes of the PCI and memory controller chipsets. Typically, Intel and other major brand motherboards provide full PCI bandwidth. Lesser motherboards often cut corners, perhaps thinking that the average desktop PC user rarely plugs anything into the PCI bus.

The available PCI bus bandwidth also depends on what other devices are utilizing PCI bandwidth. PCI versions of graphic display (S/VGA) cards and PCI based disk controllers all consume PCI bandwidth. The on-board (i.e. built onto the motherboard) graphic display (S/VGA) feature or disk controllers may also be internally attached to the PCI bus and consume PCI bandwidth.

For systems that are, including live video, close to the limit of PCI bus bandwidth, any additional graphic display (S/VGA) activity, such as opening a new window, may cause the ''PCI FIFO Overflow'' error.

Note that PCI type graphic display (S/VGA) cards will consume PCI bus bandwidth, leaving less bandwidth available for video capture. Using an AGP or PCI Express type graphic display (S/VGA) card will help alleviate PCI bus bandwidth limitations.

Aside from trying a different motherboard: a) Use an AGP or PCI Express style graphic display (S/VGA) card instead of a PCI or on-board style graphic display (S/VGA) card, b) Set the graphic display (S/VGA) to lower resolution, c) Upgrade the motherboard's microcode - especially for motherboards or computers purchased soon after release of a new design, d) Reduce the size of the image display window during live capture, and/or e) Select half video rate capture and display, the so-called Alternate Snap & Display mode (in XCAP: View, Display, Live Mode) so that video capture and image display alternates.

The PIXCI® SV2, SV3, SV4, SV5, SV5A, SV5B, and SV5L frame grabbers are, by default, configured for capturing color pixels. For monochrome cameras, using:

    PIXCI
    PIXCI Open/Close
    Camera & Format
to specify RS-170 format (or CCIR where appropriate) will reduce the bandwidth requirements (and actually improve the image sharpness!). Also note that in color mode the PIXCI® SV4, SV5, SV5A, SV5B, and SV5L frame grabbers transfer 3 bytes per pixel (RGB); they can be reconfigured to transfer 2 bytes per pixel (UYVY) decreasing PCI bandwidth requirements, albeit at the expense of increasing CPU overhead when the image is rendered or saved.

For PIXCI® A110, A310, CL2, D3XE, E1, E1DB, E4, E4DB, E4G2-2F, E4G2-4B, E4G2-F2B, E8, E8CAM, E8DB, e104x4-2f, e104x4-4b, e104x4-f2b, EB1, EB1-PoCL, EB1mini, EC1, ECB1, ECB1-34, ECB2, EL1, EL1DB, ELS2, SI1, SI2, SI4, SV7, and SV8 frame grabbers can, depending on camera, be configured to capture 8 or more bits per pixel value. In 10 or 12 bit mode, the frame grabber can use two bytes per value or can ''pack'' four 10 bit values into five bytes, or two 12 bit values into three bytes. Use of the ''Bit Packing'' option will reduce bandwidth requirements by 5/8 for 10 bit values or by 3/5 for 12 bit values.

 

3.5. XCAP/XCLIB Error: 'Video not captured! (PCI FIFO Overflow)'

With some Intel S/VGA drivers circa 2010, use of Windows' ''Aero'' mode may cause the ''PCI FIFO Overflow'' error message. Disable the Windows Aero mode.

 

3.6. XCAP/XCLIB Error: 'Video not captured! (PCI FIFO Overflow)'

Circa 2010 and later motherboards may implement very aggressive power conservation, reducing the available bandwidth on the PCI bus. In BIOS, disable the:

    CPU C-State
option. On some HP systems, the option is instead:
    Idle Power Savings
and should be set to ''Normal'' rather than ''Extended''. Other common terminology used in BIOS is:
    Speed-Step Technology
    Turbo Mode
    CPU Power Management
    CPU Dynamic Voltage Management
    C3/C6/C7/EIST

Some systems may not have a suitable BIOS option. If using Linux, disabling all of ACPI as a boot time option will disable the C-State option (add ''acpi=off'' to the kernel boot command line in grub.conf). Some laptops may enable C-State when using battery power, and disable C-State when not using battery power.

In Windows 7, selecting:

    Power Plans: High Performance
should disable C-State; however tests with Windows 7 and various motherboards show inconsistent results.

In circa 2012 and later systems, the BIOS may show

    CPU Enhanced Halt (C1E)
and/or
    C3/C6 State Support
options; these should be disabled.

 

3.7. DOS & Windows 95/98 - EMM386.SYS Issues

For application programs running under DOS or Windows 95/98, the presence of EMM386 may prevent proper operation of bus mastering PCI cards. The EMM386.SYS should be removed from CONFIG.SYS.

 

3.8. PC Halts or Reboots

Generally: If the PC halts or reboots after the PIXCI® frame grabber has been opened but is not yet capturing video, the problem may be an IRQ or other resource conflict; see IRQ Sharing, above. For PCI Express PIXCI® frame grabbers, also see Windows - Blue Screen of Death (BSoD), above.

If the PC halts or reboots only after a bus mastering (DMA) type of PIXCI® frame grabber is capturing video, the problem may be insufficient bandwidth on the PCI bus. See Bus Mastering, above, and check that burst mode is enabled. See Video not captured! (PCI FIFO Overflow), above. Also, in XCAP, use:

    PIXCI
    PIXCI Video Setup
and reduce the horizontal resolution (i.e. data pixels per line) to (approximately) 1/4 or 1/10 of the previous value. If video can be successfully captured (ignoring the truncated appearance), then PCI bus bandwidth was likely insufficient.

 

3.9. Windows DOS Box & Bus Mastering

DOS versions of EPIX® imaging software will not work with PCI bus mastering cards when run under a DOS prompt under Windows. Either boot to real DOS, or under Windows 95/98 use ''Start'', ''Shut Down'', and ''Restart the Computer in MS-DOS Mode''.

 

3.10. Asus/VIA P4X266A

Asus motherboards and VIA PCI chipsets, such as P4X266A (circa June 2002) do not implement DMA transfers properly. An unofficial patch by George Bresse (see www.tech-report.com/onearticle.x/3280) improves performance of these chipsets but does not entirely fix the problem.

 

3.11. x4 & x8 PCI Express Slots

On some motherboards (circa 2009), the x4 or x8 PCI Express Slot is intended only for a S/VGA card - providing high bandwidth transfers from PC memory to the PCI Express card, but only supporting low bandwidth transfers from the PCI Express card into PC memory. The latter mode is required by PIXCI® frame grabbers.

XCAP may, or may not, be able to explicitly warn the user if a PIXCI® E4, E4DB, E4G2-2F, E4G2-4B, E4G2-F2B, E8, E8CAM, E8DB, e104x4-2f, e104x4-4b, e104x4-f2b, or SI4 is used in such a slot, depending on how the motherboard implements the bandwidth reduction.

 

3.12. x1 & x4 PCI Express Slots

On some motherboards with x4 PCI Express slots, BIOS provides options as to whether the slot is configured as a single x4 PCI Express slot, or as four x1 PCI Express slots (using an adapter to ''break-out'' the necessary signals to four x1 PCI Express cards. A x4 PCI Express card can be used with the slot configured to the four x1 PCI Express slot mode, but the slot will not provide the bandwidth expected of a x4 PCI Express slot. (Circa 24-Jan-2012).


 

 

 

4. Graphic Display (S/VGA) Settings

 

4.1. DOS - Colors & Grey Levels

The XCIP program for DOS supports graphic display (S/VGA) cards which include VESA BIOS support. Adapters without VESA BIOS support will be operated in VGA mode. Within MSD[1], the ''V'' command will show whether VESA BIOS support is available. For display cards lacking VESA BIOS support, a TSR (Terminate and Stay Resident program) supplied by the card's manufacturer must be loaded before XCIP is run.

For S/VGA modes which provide 224 colors, (the default choice of XCIP for DOS when used with color video), some S/VGA cards require 2 MByte of S/VGA memory, but allow switching to this mode even when only 1 MByte of memory is installed. The symptom is a VGA screen wraparound, which appears about 5 text lines from the top and/or bottom. Additional memory should be added to the S/VGA card, a different S/VGA card used, or XCIP advised to forgo color display by use of the ''-svga 640x480x8'' command line option.

 

4.2. Windows - Colors & Grey Levels

The XCIP and XCAP programs for Windows display imagery on the computer's graphic display (S/VGA) monitor. The quality of the displayed images is dependent on Window's settings and operation of the graphics display (S/VGA) card. The default Windows 95 installation, for example, may use the 16 Color setting, resulting in poor quality image display! For Windows 95/98 and Windows NT, the settings can be modified in the ''Control Panel'', ''Display'', ''Settings''.

For the XCIP program for Windows, a ''256 Color'' setting is suggested for display of monochrome images, a ''True Color (24 bit or 16777216 Color)'' or ''True Color (32 bit)'' setting is suggested for display of color or pseudo-colored images.

For the XCAP program for Windows, a ''High Color (16 bit or 65536 Color)'', ''True Color (24 bit or 16777216 Color)'', or ''True Color (32 bit)'' setting for the graphic display (S/VGA) adapter is required for proper display of images and overlay graphics; the ''True Color (24 bit or 16777216 Color)'' or ''True Color (32 bit)'' is suggested for higher quality, and quicker, display of images and overlay graphics. Also, in Windows 95, under ''Control Panel'', ''Display'', ''Plus!'', the ''Show window contents while dragging'' must be disabled (this feature is not present in older versions of Windows 95). Or in Windows 98 or 2000, under ''Control Panel'', ''Display'', ''Effects'', the ''Show window contents while dragging'' should be disabled. Or in Windows XP, under ''Control Panel'', ''Appearance & Themes'', ''Display'', ''Appearance'', ''Effects'', the ''Show window contents while dragging'' should be disabled.

After changing the settings a full shutdown and CTRL+ALT+DEL reboot should be used. (The quick restart offered by older versions of Windows 95, and the dynamic graphic display (VGA) reconfiguration performed by newer versions of Windows 95/98, may not re-initialize all devices properly).

 

4.3. Windows - S/VGA Accelerators

There are reports of problems with later releases XCAP V2.2 using Java 1.3.1 and some S/VGA cards under Windows 2000, causing XCAP to lock up the PC (whether or not the PIXCI® frame grabber is installed or open). Disable the S/VGA Accelerator by using Start, Control Panel, Display, Settings, Advanced, Troubleshooting and set the Hardware Acceleration to None.

 

4.4. Linux - Colors & Grey Levels

Under Linux, for best image display quality and display rate, the graphics display system (S/VGA) should be in TrueColor or DirectColor mode.

 

4.5. Graphics Display Resolution

For flat panel LCD and other ''discrete'' graphics display systems, set the resolution specified in the operating system identical to the display's physical resolution. Other choices cause the display system to interpolate pixels, causing aliasing, poor graphics, and hard to read text.


 

 

 

5. Memory Resources

 

5.1. Frame Buffer Memory Allocation

Under Linux and under Windows NT and later operating systems, a computer can be populated with 4 GBytes of memory. Under 64 bit operating systems, a computer can be populated with more than 4 GBytes of memory. The Intel architecture overlaps BIOS, PCI configuration space, and other resources onto the high end of the 4 GByte address space; the memory at the high end of the 4 GByte address space is inaccessible to the operating system and can't be used as frame buffer memory.[2] Some 64 bit motherboards provide a

    Remap memory above 4GB
BIOS option so that memory which overlaps BIOS, PCI configuration space, and other resources is ''moved'' above 4 GBytes and is not lost.

The address space ''takeaway'' is of special concern when using forceful memory allocation. The operating system is instructed to use less than the available memory (e.g. only the first 1 GByte of 4 GByte), and the PIXCI® frame grabber must be instructed to use an explicit address and size of frame buffer memory (e.g. starting at the 1 GByte address and using 2.5 GByte). Or under 64 bit operating systems where the PIXCI® frame grabber can be instructed to use an explicit address and size of frame buffer memory and an explicit exclusion for the ''takeaway'' (e.g. on a computer with 8 GByte of memory, starting at the 1 GByte address and using 7 GByte excluding the 0.5 GByte ''takeaway'').

If the PIXCI® frame grabber is instructed to use forceful memory allocation with frame buffer memory overlapping ''takeaway'' address space: displaying frame buffers which overlap may result in all white or random pixel values, capturing frame buffers which overlap may result in no effect on the contents of the frame buffer, or may severely degrade operation of the computer system.

BIOS typically reports how much physical memory is installed, and how much is available after ''takeaways''. Note that motherboards with PCI Express support tend to have much larger ''takeaways'' than older motherboards with 32 or 64 bit PCI support. The XCAP, Driver Assistant, Set Frame Buffer Memory Size feature can't automatically determine the ''takeaway'', but takes an educated guess and sets:

    BIOS Reserved Memory Hole Size
appropriately. The user should review the default ''takeaway'' size and correct as needed.

The Intel Dynamic Video Memory Technology (DVMT) (circa 2006) may cause similar problems when using forceful memory allocation, as it uses 8 MByte or more allocated by BIOS at the high end of physical memory. When the computer has less than 4 GByte of memory and this ''takeaway'' occurs at, for example, immediately below the 2 GByte address, the PIXCI ® frame grabber must be instructed to use an explicit address and size of frame buffer memory (e.g. starting at the 1 GByte address and using 1016 Mbyte) so as to exclude the memory used by DVMT.

The Intel vPro Technology (circa 2010?) may cause similar problems when using forceful memory allocation, as it uses memory between the 768 MByte and 1024 MByte addresses. The PIXCI ® frame grabber must be instructed to use an explicit address and size of frame buffer memory (e.g. starting not lower than the 1024 MByte address) so as to exclude the memory used by vPro.

 

5.2. Frame Buffer Memory vs. S/VGA Memory Space

When trying to configure a computer for the maximum amount of frame buffer memory and the maximum amount of frame buffers, using a S/VGA card with the minimal amount of S/VGA memory is often beneficial. The S/VGA memory is mapped into the computer's memory space, reducing the amount of accessible computer memory (even if not reducing the amount of physical computer memory), and thereby reducing the amount of available frame buffer memory. (Added 19-Jan-2012).

 

5.3. Windows 95/98 - Frame Buffer Memory Allocation

Under Windows 95 and 98, when using EPIXXC.SYS to allocate large amounts of frame buffer memory, problems may arise if other devices require memory within a specific range of physical addresses. In particular ATI graphic display (S/VGA) cards and some 3COM network interface cards appear to require memory below 64 MByte. Memory for these needs can be reserved with the:

    -MH kbytes_to_reserve
parameter to EPIXXC.SYS. Using ''-MH 1024'' is sufficient for ATI cards, using ''-MH''8192 or ''-MH''16384 is sufficient for the 3COM 3C900.

 

 

 

6. Miscellaneous Topics

 

6.1. Startup Crashes and Hangups

By default, XCAP automatically opens the PIXCI® frame grabber, automatically displays an image, and automatically (optionally) captures live video. To help determine the cause of a startup problem, it is helpful to separate these actions.

Edit file:

    xcap.ini
in XCAP's installation directory. Change line:
    videosetup.xc.autoopen=1
to:
    videosetup.xc.autoopen=0
and change line:
    videosetup.xc.autolive=1
to:
    videosetup.xc.autolive=0
Start XCAP to see if it crashes w/out displaying an image or opening the PIXCI® frame grabber.

In XCAP:

    Images
    New Image
    OK
    Modify (in Image View Window)
    Patterns
    OK
If XCAP crashes, it is likely a problem with the API used to display images. Restart XCAP and try:
    Utility
    Program Setup
    API's
    GDI API?
Try
    Images
    New Image
    ..
again.

When Images, New Image operates correctly, use:

    PIXCI
    PIXCI Open/Close
    Open
to explicitly open the PIXCI® frame grabber, then use:
    Capture
    Live
to explicitly start live capture.

 

6.2. Linux Error: 'Cannot Restore segment prot after reloc'

Newer releases of Linux, circa 2007, have enabled new security extensions called ''SELinux''. The SELinux may prevent loading of XCAP's libjpxiplhl_i386.so file, and perhaps others. Disable SELinux by editing /etc/selinux/config and setting

    SELINUX=disabled
Or prevent SELinux from loading by using the
    chcon
command on each file.

 

6.3. Windows Error: 'Data Execution Protection (DEP)'

The Data Execution Protection (DEP) feature may prevent XCAP from starting, or may allow XCAP to start but later abruptly terminate XCAP. The Data Execution Protection (DEP) should be disabled, either in BOOT.INI or via the Windows' Control Panel.

XCAP's incompatibility with DEP is due to XCAP's use of a Java engine. XCLIB and PXIPL are compatible with DEP.

 

6.4. Linux SUSE Error: 'xcb_xlib_unlock: Assertion c->xlib.lock failed'

On distributions of opensuse 10.x an error:

    xcb_xlib_unlock: Assertion 'c->xlib.lock' failed
may occur when running a Java application, such as XCAP. Workaround:
    export LIBXCB_ALLOW_SLOPPY_LOCK=1
before running XCAP. The workaround can be added to the /usr/local/bin/xcap or to the /usr/local/xcap/xcaplnx shell files.

 

6.5. DOS4GW and Serial ATA's AHCI Mode

Running an XCLIB DOS4GW application in conjunction with a serial ATA (i.e. hard drive) configured to AHCI mode may cause the computer to crash. Selecting serial ATA Compatibility mode instead of AHCI mode in BIOS appears to eliminate the problem.

 

6.6. Anti-Viral Software with Registry Protection

McAfee anti-viral software with registry protection, circa 2008, prevents users - even those with Administrator privileges - from editing the registry. This is, by itself, only a minor annoyance when trying to change PIXCI® frame grabber parameters.

However, the registry protection may also prevent Windows Service Packs from installing properly (specifically reported with Windows XP SP3), causing all kinds of mischief and problems. For example, the ''Unable to Map Image Memory (DDK MmMapIoSpace'' error may be intermittently reported.

 

6.7. XCAP/XCLIB Error: 'Can't access 18V8/16LV8'

The ''Can't access 18V8/16LV8'' error normally indicates a hardware problem on a PIXCI® SV2, SV3, SV4, SV5, SV5A, SV5B, SV5L, or SV6. The same error can also occur if the PIXCI® driver may be associated with a non-PIXCI card; see PCI Vendor and Device ID Conflict, above.

The same error will also occur under Windows Vista, 7, 8, or 10 after awaking from hibernation or sleep mode. Disabling Sleep and Hibernation modes in Windows is recommended. An updated driver, circa 6/2015, (a) Will prevent Windows from sleeping while the PIXCI® frame grabber is in use, and (b) Has an option to enable recovery after Windows sleeps w. the PIXCI® frame grabber not in use.

 

6.8. XCAP/XCLIB Error: 'Data path error'

The ''Data path error'' error normally indicates a hardware problem on a PIXCI® A110, A310, D3XE, CL1, CL2, E1, E1DB, E4, E4DB, E4G2-2F, E4G2-4B, E4G2-F2B, E8, E8CAM, E8DB, e104x4-2f, e104x4-4b, e104x4-f2b, EB1, EB1-PoCL, EB1mini, EB1tg, EC1, ECB1, ECB1-34, ECB2, EL1, EL1DB, ELS2, SI1, SI2, SI4, SV7, or SV8 frame grabber.

The same error will also occur under Windows Vista, 7, 8, or 10 after awaking from hibernation or sleep mode. Disabling Sleep and Hibernation modes in Windows is recommended. An updated driver, circa 6/2015, (a) Will prevent Windows from sleeping while the PIXCI® frame grabber is in use, and (b) Has an option to enable recovery after Windows sleeps w. the PIXCI® frame grabber not in use. Less often, the hibernation or sleep problem may be reported as ''Invalid register base address'', with the same remedy.

On Windows 10, the same error may occur when the Windows' ''Fast startup'' option is enabled; disabling the option is recommended.

 

6.9. Camera Link Problem: Pixel Data not Captured

The camera appears to operate correctly, the measured video frame rate and capture frame rate are correct, no errors are reported. But the frame buffer retains its previous pixel data (typically black); a test pattern drawn by XCAP is displayed properly.

Selecting the ''Use DVAL'' option in XCAP (Generic Camera Link, Capture & Adjust dialog) in conjunction with a camera that does not assert the optional DVAL signal prevents any pixel data from being captured. No error is reported, as the imaging card, camera, and software are operating correctly as per the selected configuration of DVAL.

 

6.10. Authorization Keys - Parallel Port Style

Some versions of EPIX® imaging software are provided with an authorization key which must be connected to printer parallel port 1, 2, or 3. Should software advise that the authorization key is not found:

  1. Check that the key is connected to printer parallel port 1, 2, or 3, and not to an RS-232 or other port using the same style connector,[3]

  2. For PC's with plug in parallel port adapters which are not Plug & Play: Check that multiple parallel port adapters with the same port number are not installed or enabled,[4]

  3. For PC's using DOS, or Windows 95/98 with a dual boot option to DOS: After running the MSD program, use ''L'' to check whether any LPT ports are configured,

  4. Check that the BIOS setting, if any, for the printer port allows PC-AT compatibility. A typical BIOS Setup entry is:
        Parallel Port Type      Compatible
    
    Settings such as:
        Parallel Port Type      EPP
        Parallel Port Type      ECP
    
    may prevent recognition of the key, or may prevent reliable printing.

  5. On rare combinations of PC's and printers, the authorization key may not be recognized if the printer (connected to the back of the authorization key) is powered off; either disconnect the printer cable or turn the printer on.

  6. On certain PC's, the printer port and therefore the authorization key may be improperly reset during boot. Under DOS or Windows 95/98, add:
        HLRESET.COM     (precede with path name to directory of EPIX® software!)
    
    as the last line of AUTOEXEC.BAT to reset the key.

  7. Newer versions of EPIX® imaging software can optionally use a USB version of the authorization for use in conjunction with an operating system with USB support. Use of a USB key eliminates printer parallel port configuration issues.

Typically, the authorization key can be ''stacked'' on the printer parallel port with other authorization keys for other software; however due to the wide variety of key types provided by other companies, there is no guarantee of mutual compatibility.

JTAG programming tools from Xilinx should NOT be stacked onto the XCAP authorization key.

 

6.11. Authorization Keys - 64 Bit Linux

The driver to support parallel port style authorization keys may not compile on newer 64 bit kernels in which the register_ioctl32_conversion function has been deprecated. Use of the USB style authorization key avoids the problem and is recommended for 64 bit Linux systems.

 

6.12. Authorization Keys - USB Style

It may assist with some system configuration issues to know that the USB key has Vendor ID of 0529 and a Device ID of 0001, and may be variously identified as a Aladdin Hardlock, Aladdin USB Key, Aladdin HASP, Safenet HASP device, or Gemalto HASP device.

The smaller version of the USB authorization key (approximately 5.2×1.6×0.8 cm), has a LED visible through the plastic case. The LED illuminates after the key has been connected and identified as a USB device, regardless of whether XCAP is running. An unlit LED typically implies a bad key, a bad USB slot, or the operating system's USB drivers are not (yet) loaded.

On Linux Ubuntu distributions with 2.6.31 and later kernels, the Linux features ''usbdevfs'' and ''usbfs'' used by the authorization key daemon aksusbd as supplied with XCAP V3.0 or V3.7 are no longer supported. A newer aksusbd and its associated hasp.rules and dinst as supplied with XCAP V3.8 (Oct 2013 release) resolves the issue. Those files can be extracted from the V3.8 release for use with XCAP V3.0 or V3.7; however, the authorization key must be installed manually via dinst, the Driver Assistant in V3.0 or V3.7 should not be used.

The Linux aksusbd authorization key daemon for USB keys is a 32 bit program; The Linux IA32 (32 bit compatibility) libraries must be installed. Some 64 bit distributions are not pre-configured to allow running 32 bit programs; use

    sudo apt-get install ia32-libs
to allow running aksusbd.

 

6.13. Authorization Keys - Windows Remote Desktop

If the first access to an authorization key is via a program (i.e. XCAP), initiated via a remote desktop connection then the authorization key may not be properly detected.

One workaround is to have XCAP auto-started when Windows boots; running XCAP from a remote desktop connection would no longer be the first access to the authorization key. The XCAP ''Auto Startup: Wait for Drivers'' option should be enabled, as Windows might auto start XCAP before loading the authorization key's driver.

 

6.14. Authorization Keys - Not Found under Windows 2000 and later

The authorization key vendor reports that some USB keys manufactured between 2006 and 2008 may appear to fail. A new authorization driver, Version 4.115.5.55 (Oct 2008), or later, fixes the problem.

 

6.15. Mice and Graphics Display (S/VGA) Cards

If the mouse cursor blinks on and off while the mouse cursor is positioned over the live video image display, either:

  1. Switch to a graphics display (S/VGA) card that provides hardware mouse cursor support.

  2. If the graphics display (S/VGA) card does provides hardware mouse cursor support, contact the graphics display (S/VGA) manufacturer for an improved driver.

  3. As a last resort, in XCAP, switch graphics display (S/VGA) display modes from the faster, default ''DirectX API'' to a (possibly slower) alternative:
        View
        Display
        API
    
    and select
        GDI API
    
    or
        Video for Windows API
    
    or any selection other than ''DirectX API''.

 

6.16. Serial Mice versus Cameras w. RS-232 Control

Under Windows NT, the auto configuration performed while booting can incorrectly identify certain cameras with RS-232 controls as a serial mouse. Any COM port incorrectly identified becomes unavailable to all applications, such as XCAP.

A simple solution is to leave the camera powered off or disconnected while booting. Alternately, in Control Panel, Services or Devices, the ''sermouse'' service can be set to manual. Alternately, the boot.ini file can be edited adding:

    /NoSerialMouse              disable detection on all COM ports
    /NoSerialMouse:COMx         disable detection on COMx ports
    /NoSerialMouse:COMx,y,z     disable detection on COMx, y, and z ports
to the end of any or all boot descriptor lines, such as:
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(7)\WINNT="Windows NT ..." /NoSerialMouse
Some versions of Windows NT may instead require the:
    /FASTDETECT
option in boot.ini; consult your Windows systems administrator for additional guidance.

7. Footnotes

[1]
The Microsoft MSD.EXE program, provided with Windows 3.1, DOS 6.0, C 7.0, and other Microsoft programs is a valuable tool for identifying use of memory and other resources.
[2]
See the Intel white paper, Intel Chipset 4 GB System Memory Support, dated February 2005.
[3]
Connection to a 25-pin serial (RS-232) port, or to any other interface which happens to use the same style connector, may permanently damage the authorization key and void its warranty.
[4]
Multiple parallel port adapters set at the same port number may have no adverse impact on printer operation; but an authorization key attached to these ports will not operate correctly. Even though the printer works, the parallel port adapter configuration must still be checked.